MEMBERS CURRICULUMS

JOSE LUIS PAYRO

COMMITTEE PRESIDENT LEADER

Dr. Payro is president of the Mexican Kennel Club.

Medical Veterinarian Doctor of the NationalUniversity of Mexico, where he has been  a teacher since 1974.

Approved to judge all breeds in 1975 by Mexican Kennel Club (FCM). Committee in the FCI

Actual president of the FCI Americas &  Caribbean Section member of the FCI Board of directors Dr. José Luis Payró Dueñas received the title of Doctor Honoris Causa conferred by the Mexican Institute of Leaders of Excellence (IMELE).

The doctorate Honoris Causa is the highest honorary title that IMELE grants to illustrious Mexicans or foreigners for their relevant contributions in different fields or knowledge.

Current director and founder of the first career in veterinary medicine zootechnics focused on small species in the world, considered one the 300 most important leaders of the year 2017 in Mexico.

GOPI KRISHNAN

SECRETARY

Gopi Krishnan studying in the UK for nine years afforded Gopi the opportunity to attend dog shows every weekend and the many hours spent ringside, showing, visiting top kennels and breeders helped foster Gopi’s love and interest in the Dachshund. Together with his brother Robbie, the HACIENDA prefix was registered in 1994 and their first litter registered in 1999. In 2008, Gopi married Christine and since then she has also been part of the Hacienda prefix. Focused on getting the best lines, they have imported dogs from the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, USA, Finland & South Africa.

Hacienda have successfully owned, co-owned, campaigned (owner exhibited) and titled 154 Champions in Std. Smooth, Std. Longhaired & Min. Longhaired Dachshunds, English Setter and English Cocker Spaniels. Of the 154 Champions, 104 are proudly homebred HACIENDA Champions, both locally and overseas, in Australia, England, Ireland, USA, Canada, Brazil, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Italy, Switzerland, Poland, Slovenia, Estonia, Russia, New Zealand, South Africa, Japan, Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, the Philippines, Indonesia, Singapore and Thailand, with others on track to their titles in various other countries around the globe. Several of these homebred Champions are proudly Multiple All Breeds Best in Show Winners overseas and Grand champions.

Professionally, Gopi is involved in the IT line and is the CEO of a global IT Services company headquartered in Malaysia. Gopi’s love of animals and his interest in the promotion of responsible pet ownership has led to his involvement with PAWS Animal Welfare Society, which he served as in the capacity of President for 6 years and which he currently serves as Secretary. Gopi has also served on the Malaysian Kennel Association’s (MKA) Board for several terms and is currently the President. Gopi also serves on the FCI Asia & Pacific Section Board as Vice President.

Gopi joined the MKA judges training scheme in the 1990’s and since then he has had the privilege to judge in Malaysia, the Philippines, UK, India, China, Thailand, Taiwan, Japan, Indonesia, Ireland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Estonia, Croatia, Norway, South Africa, Mexico, Costa Rica, Brazil, Colombia, USA, Australia and New Zealand. Gopi is an MKA & FCI licensed International All Breeds judge

WENCHE KOGLI

We have all always been concerned with giving back to the dog world, in the form of having positions and various tasks, in the KC or breed clubs and FCI.

Bord member in the Norwegian schweisshund asosiation. (1999-2001) Board member in the Norwegian Basset club for all six basset breeds ( 2010) .

Diffrent commity work in show , track and hunting comity in the Norwegian Basset club.( 2009-2019) .

Vice pressident of the Norwegian Basset club ( 2012-2013) . Pressident of the Norwegian Basset club for several years . ( 2013- 2019)

Pressident of the Norwegian Boston terrier club for one year. ( 2018-2019)

(2017-2019) .Representing the NKK in the Nordic Kennel union (2017- 2019) Current position is a bord member in the Norwegian Bulldog club with fokus on the brachycephalic isues and working with th

JULIE SANDERS

Julie spent the first part of her career working in the advertising world, including working in Australia for 2 years as an Account Manager for an Advertising Agency in Sydney. Following this Julie spent several years working in the corporate world including working in the position of Head of Global Charity Programmes for British Telecom (BT) for 6 years. During this time, she oversaw the set-up of BT’s first ever global charity programme working with UNICEF on projects in South Africa, Brazil, China, and India. Julie also set up BT’s first ever disaster relief volunteer programme working in partnership with the British Red

Besides her working career Julie spent ten years volunteering in the animal welfare sector as a Trustee and Welfare Officer for a sighthound rescue organisation and is founder of an animal welfare organisation in Ireland, focused on improving the welfare of racing

Her interest was taken onto a new level when she decided to leave her position at BT to study full time for a BSc degree in Animal Behavioural Science and Welfare, at the University of Greenwich, achieving a First Class

In 2013 Julie was appointed Country Director for FOUR PAWS International in the UK. She was responsible for leading the UK office, managing the fundraising, finance, campaigns, and communication departments. In 2015 she became the International Director of the Companion Animals Department, at FOUR In her current role she is responsible for the strategic direction of the Department including creating compelling international campaigns to advance companion animal welfare, overseeing the operation of FOUR PAWS stray animal care programmes worldwide and managing a team of 50 veterinary staff, campaigners and animal welfare specialists, word wide.

Julie has always loved animals especially dogs and her family includes a rescued Saluki, a rescued Whippet, and 2 Italian

SARAH ROS

08/2007 – 07/2011 Animal Management Van Hall Larenstein Hogeschool Leeuwarden, Netherlands Major: Politics and Communication Minor: Animal Assisted Therapy Bachelor (8,0 von 10,0).

09/2005 – 07/2007 Animal Keeper Tierheim Uhlenkrog Kiel“ Medium-sized animal shelter in Schleswig-Holstein Degree with honors

 

Further Education

EDV MS Outlook (sehr gut) MS Word (sehr gut) MS Excel (sehr gut) MS Powerpoint (sehr gut)

Training Project managementMeeting, FacilitationCrisis, communication, Press training Design YouTube Videos, Shelter managemen

EKATERINA DOMOGOTSKAYA

Ekaterina DOMOGATSKAYA, Russian Kynological Federation

Education: Moscow State Lomonosov University, Philological Faculty

Researcher in Philological Sciences, Deputy Dean, Head of Editorial Department (up to 2018)

Current positions & involvements:

  • Head of RKF International Department (since 2018) Head of RKF Show Commission (since 2018)
  • RKF Board member (since 2018)
  • President of Russian Hunting Dog Federation (since 2016)
  • Board member (since 2008), Vice President (since 2012) of Russian National Dachshund Club
  • RKF delegate to FCI Earth Dog commission (since 2013)
  • RKF delegate to FCI Show commission (since 2019; elected as the Secretary in 2020) RKF delegate to FCI commission for Education & Public Relations (since 2019) Member of WUT Standard commission
  • Executive editor of “WUT Magazine”
  • Founder & chief editor of the Russian magazine “Dachshund. People & Teckel” Founder & editor of RKF & Royal Canin educational project “Responsible Breeding Online” (2020)
  • Dachshund breeder (since 1999

AXEL DUBOIS

“All time dog lover Axel Dubois joined Royal Canin in 2000 in the United Kingdom. He put in place the Royal Canin Breeder programme which was key to develop a partnership with breeders for mutual benefits. After various missions in the UK and France he is now in charge of deploying the PROACTIVE programme to help ensure that breeders grow in a sustainable and responsible way through efficient and relevant tools and services, in order to reach together our common mission: the health and well-being of cats and dogs.”

ERNESTO LARRE

Pro and Digital Marketing Director – Royal Canin Iberia from January 2018 to date. Responsible for sales and marketing of the Professional Channel for the Iberia Cluster. Responsible for the correct implementation of the Global strategy and the use of the PRO mission. Responsible for the implementation of CRM and Digital Marketing. He was Director of Marketing and Professional Sales – Royal Canin Iberia Oct 2015 – Jan 2018

Management of the sales team. Responsible for the results of independent distributors, government accounts and KOL’s. Deploy the model of perfect execution and prescription within Iberia.

ATTILA MARTON

FCI public relations consultant. Vice President of the World Canine Press Association. Former Executive Director of the Hungarian Kennel Club; project manager of the FCI IPO World Championship of Utility Dogs and the FCI World Dog Show 2013 Budapest. Former consultant in education related to canine welfare and public relations for the Lithuanian Kennel Club. Over a hundred publications (in English and Hungarian) focus on animal welfare issues related to dogs. Author of the book “Barking Up the Wrong Tree” (published in 2015)

NIKSA LEMO

Graduated from the Veterinary Faculty of the University of Zagreb. During the study he received two student awards: Waltham Student Award 1996, England and Rector’s Award 1997, Zagreb.

Since 2001, he has been working as assistant at the Department of Internal Medicine. In 2005 he defended his doctoral dissertation. Since 2006 he has been a resident of the ECVD at the

Dr. Lemo is currently a full professor and head of the clinical division of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of Zagreb. Moreover Dr. Lemo is a regional representative of EBVS and an expert of EAEVE for evaluation vet schools.

Dr. Niksa Lemo is an FCI international judge, who has judged both national and international dog shows, as well as numerous breed specialties, on all six continents.

Dr. Lemo is a tenured university professor and board certified veterinary dermatologist (DiplECVD).

He conducts seminars for student judges, judges and breeders; he has also been an invited speaker at numerous world club breed conferences.

CLAUDIO ROSSI

Professional School: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, Londrina State University (UEL), Brazil (2001).

Residency: Internal Medicine, Surgery, and Anesthesiology of Small Animals, São Paulo State University (FMVA/UNESP), Araçatuba, Brazil (2003-2005).

Master of Science: Internal Small Animal Medicine, São Paulo State University, Jaboticabal (FCAV/UNESP), Brazil (2007).

Doctor of Phylosophy: Internal Small Animal Medicine, São Paulo University (FMVZ/USP), São Paulo, Brazil (2013).

Specialization: Veterinary Dermatology Specialist, Brazilian Society of Veterinary Dermatology (SBDV), São Paulo, Brazil (2018).

 

RAYMUNDO W. LO

Dr. Raymundo Lo is an American Board-certified pathologist. He started in purebred dogs in 1970 when as a student, he met his first Pekingese. Since then, he has been enamored with this Imperial breed from China, breeding and showing under the prefix Dreamville.

Dr. Lo’s breeding philosophy is to aspire for correct conformation as well as soundness and good health which are not mutually exclusive. He believes correct breeding practices within the breed are essential to any breed if it is to be healthy and fit for purpose. He practices this philosophy in his judging by emphasizing soundness and good general health in evaluating entries aside from considering breed type and conformation. Dr. Lo also conducts breeding seminars and participates in for a locally and abroad to pursue his agenda for better canine health.

WELFARE AND HEALTH DEFINITION

BY JOSE LUIS PAYRO

Dog ś welfare & health means how dogs are coping with the conditions in which they lives. A dog is in a good state of welfare if it is healthy, comfortable, well nourished, safe, able to express innate behavior, and if it is not suffering from unpleasant states such as pain, fear, and distress.

 

Introduction

By Wenche Skogli

The FCI welfare and health committee for dogs worldwide was appointed by the FCI board members to ensure the welfare and to enhance the health. Its most important task is to promote, preserve and protect dogs.We believe that dog welfare starts with responsible breeding, followed by responsible ownership.

Dogs for utility and pleasure worldwide!! The most important part is to enlighten and educate people all over the world. Cynology means “The doctrine of dogs” and that is the most important mission of the FCI; the FCI started in 1911 with five naAons, in 2021 there are 99 Members and Contract partners with the same, intenAon and devoAons to preserve, protect and promote pedigree dogs worldwide.

This makes the FCI the largest organisaAon for pedigree dogs with over one hundred years of registered pedigrees, science, activities, welfare and health educations about dogs and history of the 400 FCI reconised breeds.

No other organisation has this kin d of pedigree registration system, research results or knowledge under the same umbrella. This makes FCI the leading body of knowledge regarding welfare, health, breeding,and responsible dog owners in treatment for dogs. It is FCI obligation to enlighten, difretent countries and dog owners in general because in modern society it is important to maintain the position and importance of dogs, as they have many tasks such as good companions and working dogs.

Being the connection between the FCI members, the national dog organisations, regular dog keepers, people in general, the animal welfare and health groups, the FCI organization includes some key points :

  • Promote, protect and preserve dogs worldwide. Be the leading body for Members and Contract Partners, the society, and animal welfare groups for questions about dog welfare, health, and educations.
  • Promote the power of over hundred years of registered dogs, health, and knowledge.
  • Educate and enlighten FCI Members/Contract Partners, breeders, governments, and people in general about cynology and the place and purpose of dogs in society.

Educate people in general and everyday dog keepers about responsible dog ownership. Ensure that all FCI Members/Contract Partners strive that all dogs live healthy and happy lives. Over hundred years of organized dog acAviAes and breeding gives them a solid basis and knowledge in terms of teaching about dogs.

 

FCI WELFARE AND HEALTH GENERAL GUIDELINES

DOG ́S MUST BE FREE FROM PAIN & SUFFERING.

Dogs feel pain and have similar pain thresholds to people. However, individual dogs and different breeds or types may show pain and suffering in different ways. Any change in the way a dog behaves can be an early sign that it is ill, or in pain. Dogs which are ill, or in pain, often change their eating and drinking habits. They may eat less or stop eating and lose weight. They may drink water excessively; drink less or not at all. Some dogs become withdrawn and unwilling to exercise or play, cry when approached or touched, some dogs in dogs shows may have signs uncharacteristic fear or aggression when judges approached, or they may try to hide.

They may also show specific signs of ill health such as discharges from the eyes, ears or nose, excessive salivation, vomiting, diarrhea or constipation, difficulties with passing urine, coughing, and they may scratch excessively and develop skin sores. Limping and swellings are also signs of possible ill health.

Dogs are vulnerable to a range of infectious diseases and other illnesses. They need protection from serious infections, which can be provided by vaccination.

Many people choose to have their dogs neutered. If there is no interest to breed dogs, veterinarians can advise on neutering and the health benefits of neutering dogs. If the decision is to breed dogs, veterinarians can advise on the risks of inherited conditions that could affect the welfare of the puppies. A dog which can be easily identified by tattoo, microchips etc. more likely to be reunited with its owner if injured, or lost, particularly if it loses its collar. It is thus more likely to receive the prompt veterinary treatment it needs if injured. What breeders or owners should do:

  • Take sensible precautions to keep dogs safe from
  • If notice changes in dog’s behavior should contact veterinarians and follow the given
  • Check dogs over regularly and watch out for signs of injury, hereditary disease or Make sure someone else does this if owners are away.
  • Dogs should be carefully checked coat regularly and groomed, it is necessary to maintain a healthy

KENNEL INSIDE HOUSING FACILITIES.

Areas used for storing dogs food or bedding must be free of any accumulation of trash, waste material, junk, weeds, and other discarded materials. Dogs areas inside of housing facilities must be kept neat and free of clutter, including equipment, furniture, and stored material, but may contain materials actually used and necessary for cleaning the area, and fixtures or equipment necessary for proper husbandry practices.

SURFACES GENERAL REQUIREMENTS.

Including houses, dens, and other furniture-type fixtures and objects within the facility must be constructed in a manner and made of materials that allow them to be readily cleaned and sanitized, or removed or replaced when worn or soiled. Interior surfaces and any surfaces that come in contact with dogs must be free of excessive rust that prevents the required cleaning and sanitization, or that affects the structural strength of the surface and be free of jagged edges or sharp points that might injure the animals.

CLEANING.

Hard surfaces with which the dogs come in contact must be spot-cleaned daily and sanitized to prevent accumulation of excreta and reduce disease hazards. Floors made of dirt, absorbent bedding, sand, gravel, grass, or other similar material must be raked or spot-cleaned with sufficient frequency to ensure all animals the freedom to avoid contact with excreta.

Contaminated material must be replaced whenever this raking and spot-cleaning is not sufficient to prevent or eliminate odors, insects, pests, or vermin infestation.

WATER AND ELECTRIC POWER.

The housing facility must have reliable electric power adequate for heating, cooling, ventilation, and lighting, and for carrying out other husbandry requirements

The housing facility must provide adequate running potable water for the dogs’ drinking needs, for cleaning, and for carrying out other husbandry requirements.

STORAGE.

Supplies of food and bedding must be stored in a manner that protects the supplies from spoilage, contamination, and vermin infestation. The supplies must be stored off the floor and away from the walls, to allow cleaning underneath and around the supplies. Foods requiring refrigeration must be stored accordingly, and all food must be stored in a manner that prevents contamination and deterioration of its nutritive value. All open supplies of food and bedding must be kept in leak proof containers with tightly fitting lids to prevent contamination and spoilage. Only food and bedding that is currently being used may be kept in the dogs areas.

Substances that are toxic to the dogs but are required for normal husbandry practices must not be stored in food storage and preparation areas, but may be stored in cabinets in the dog ́s areas. Drainage and waste disposal. Housing facility operators must provide for regular and frequent collection, removal, and disposal of animal and food wastes, bedding, debris, garbage, water, other fluids and wastes, in a manner that minimizes contamination and disease risks.

Housing facilities must be equipped with disposal facilities and drainage systems that are constructed and operated so that dogs waste and water are rapidly eliminated and animals stay dry. Disposal and drainage systems must minimize vermin and pest infestation, insects, odors, and disease hazards. All drains must be properly constructed, installed, and maintained. If closed drainage systems are used, they must be equipped with traps and prevent the backflow of gases and the backup of sewage onto the floor. If the facility uses sump or settlement ponds, or other similar systems for drainage and dogs waste disposal, the system must be located far enough away from the dog ́s area of the housing facility to prevent odors, diseases, pests, and vermin infestation. Standing puddles of water in animal enclosures must be drained or mopped up so that the dogs stay dry.

Trash containers in housing facilities and in food storage and food preparation areas must be leak proof and must have tightly fitted lids on them at all times.

WASHROOMS AND SINKS

 Washing facilities such as washrooms, basins, sinks, or showers must be provided for dog ́s caretakers and must be readily accessible.

HEATING, COOLING, AND TEMPERATURE

The kennels and shelters housing facilities for dogs must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs from temperature or humidity extremes and to provide for their health and well-being, for those breeds that cannot tolerate lower temperatures without stress and discomfort (such as short-haired breeds), and for sick, aged, young, or infirm dogs. Dry bedding, solid resting boards, or other methods of conserving body heat must be provided.

VENTILATION.

Must be sufficiently ventilated at all times when dogs are present to provide for their health and well- being, and to minimize odors, drafts, ammonia levels, and moisture condensation. Ventilation must be provided by windows, vents, fans, or air conditioning. Auxiliary ventilation, such as fans, blowers, or air conditioning must be provided when the ambient temperature is higher.

LIGHTING.

Must be lighted well enough to permit routine inspection and cleaning of the facility, and observation of the dogs.

All areas must be provided a regular diurnal lighting cycle of either natural or artificial light. Lighting must be uniformly diffused throughout animal facilities and provide sufficient illumination to aid in maintaining good housekeeping practices, adequate cleaning, adequate inspection, and for the well- being.

Primary enclosures must be placed so as to protect from excessive light.

OUTSIDE KENNEL HOUSING FACILITIES

 Restrictions.

The following categories of dogs must not be kept in outdoor facilities, unless that practice is specifically approved by the attending veterinarian:

  • Dogs that are not acclimated to the temperatures prevalent in the area or region where they are maintained
  • Breeds of dogs that cannot tolerate the prevalent temperatures of the area without stress or discomfort (such as hair less and short-haired breeds in cold climates)
  • Sick, infirm, aged or young dogs and When their acclimation status is unknown, dogs must not be kept in

outdoor facilities when the ambient temperature is less than 50 °F (10 °C).

KENNEL ELEMENTS

Outdoor facilities for dogs must include one or more kennel structures that are accessible to each dog in each outdoor facility, and that are large enough to allow any dog in the kennel structure to sit, stand, and lie in a normal manner, and to turn about freely. In addition to the kennel structures, one or more separate outside areas of shade must be provided, large enough to contain all the dogs at one time and protect them from the direct rays of the sun.

  • Kennels in outdoor facilities must contain a roof, four sides, and a floor, and must:
  • Provide adequate protection and shelter from the cold and heat
  • Provide protection from the direct rays of the sun and the direct effect of wind, rain, or
  • Provide with a wind break and rain break at the entrance
  • Provide clean, dry, bedding material

CONSTRUCTION

Building surfaces in contact with dogs must be impervious to moisture. Metal barrels, cars, refrigerators or freezers, and the like must not be used as shelter structures. The floors of outdoor housing facilities may be of compacted earth, absorbent bedding, sand, gravel, or grass, and must be replaced if there are any prevalent odors, diseases, insects, pests, or vermin. All surfaces must be maintained on a regular basis. Surfaces of outdoor housing facilities—including houses, dens, etc.—that cannot be readily cleaned and sanitized, must be replaced when worn or soiled

BUILDING KENNELS

Primary enclosures must meet the following minimum requirements General requirements.

Primary enclosures must be designed and constructed of suitable materials so that they are structurally sound. The primary enclosures must be kept in good repair. Primary enclosures must be constructed and maintained so that they:

uncomfortable or hazardous to all the dogs

  • Provide sufficient shade to shelter all the dogs housed in the primary enclosure at one time Provide all the dogs with easy and convenient access to clean food and water

Have no sharp points or edges that could injure the dogs. Protect the dogs from injury Contain the dogs securely

Keep other animals from entering the enclosure

Enable the dogs to remain dry and clean

Provide shelter and protection from extreme temperatures and weather conditions that may be

  • Enable all surfaces in contact with the dogs to be readily cleaned and sanitized

TRAVELING KENNEL FACILITIES. HEATING, COOLING, AND TEMPERATURE.

Traveling Kennel facilities for dogs must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs from temperature or humidity extremes and to provide for their health and well-being. Those breeds that cannot tolerate lower temperatures without stress or discomfort (such as hairless and short-haired breeds), and for sick, aged, young, or infirm dogs. Dry bedding, solid resting boards, or other methods of conserving body heat must be provided.

The ambient temperature must not fall below 45 °F (7.2 °C) for more than 4 consecutive hours when dogs are present, and must not exceed 85 °F (29.5 °C) for more than 4 consecutive hours when dogs are present.

The preceding requirements are in addition to, not in place of.

  • VENTILATION. Traveling kennel facilities for dogs must be sufficiently ventilated at all times when dogs are present to provide for the health and well-being, and to minimize odors, drafts, ammonia levels, moisture condensation, and exhaust fumes. Ventilation must be provided by means of windows, doors, vents, fans, or air conditioning. Auxiliary ventilation, such as fans, blowers, or air conditioning, must be provided when the ambient temperature within the animal housing area is 85 °F (29.5 °C) or higher.
  • LIGHTING. Traveling housing facilities for dogs must be lighted well enough to permit proper cleaning and inspection of the facility, and observation of the dogs. Animal areas must be provided a regular diurnal lighting cycle of either natural or artificial light. Lighting must be uniformly diffused throughout animal facilities and provide sufficient illumination to aid in maintaining good housekeeping practices, adequate cleaning, adequate inspection, and for the well-being.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS

 SPACE

  • Each dog housed in a primary enclosure (including weaned puppies) must be provided a minimum amount of floor space
  • Each bitch with nursing puppies must be provided with an additional amount of floor space, based on her breed andbehavioral characteristics, and in accordance with generally accepted husbandry practices
  • The interior height of a primary enclosure must be at least 7 inches higher than the head of the tallest dog in the enclosure when it is in a normal standing position:

COMPATIBILITY.

  • All dogs housed in the same primary enclosure must be compatible, as determined by observation. Not more than 12 adult non conditioned dogs may be housed in the same primary enclosure.
  • Bitches in heat may not be housed in the same primary enclosure with sexually mature males, except for breeding purposes. Except when maintained in breeding colonies, bitches with litters may not be housed in the same primary enclosure with other adult dogs, and puppies under 3 months of age may not be housed in the same primary enclosure with adult dogs, other than the dam or foster dam.
  • Dogs with a vicious or aggressive disposition must be housed separately. Dogs in mobile or traveling shows or acts.
  • Dogs that are part of a mobile or traveling show or act may be kept, while the show or act is traveling from one temporary location to another, in transport containers that comply with all requirements before described.
  • When the show or act is not traveling, the dogs must be placed in primary enclosures that meet the minimum requirements.

EXERCISE FOR DOGS.

Breeders, exhibitors’ facilities must develop an appropriate plan to provide dogs with the opportunity for exercise. The plan, at a minimum, must comply with each of the following:

DOGS HOUSED INDIVIDUALLY.

Dogs over 10 weeks of age, except bitches with litters, housed, held, or maintained by any breeder, exhibitor, must be provided the opportunity for exercise regularly if they are kept individually in cages, pens, or runs that provide less than two times the required floor space for that dog.

DOGS HOUSED IN GROUPS.

Dogs over 10 weeks of age housed, held, or maintained in groups by any breeder, exhibitor, do not require additional opportunity for exercise regularly if they are maintained in cages, pens, or runs that provide in total at least 100 percent of the required space for each dog if maintained separately. Such dogs may be maintained in compatible groups.

PERIOD OF PROVIDING EXERCISE OPPORTUNITY

The frequency, method, and duration of the opportunity for exercise shall be determined by the breed Breeders and exhibitors, in developing their plan, should consider providing positive physical contact with humans that encourages exercise through play or other similar activities. If a dog is housed, held, or

maintained at a facility without sensory contact with another dog, it must be provided with positive physical contact with humans at least daily.

The opportunity for exercise may be provided in a number of ways, such as

  • Group housing in cages, pens or runs that provide at least 100 percent of the required space for each dog if maintained separately under the minimum floor space
  • Maintaining individually housed dogs in cages, pens, or runs that provide at least twice the minimum floor space required
  • Providing access to a run or open area at the frequency and duration
  • Other similar

Forced exercise methods or devices such as swimming, treadmills, or carousel-type devices are unacceptable for meeting the exercise requirements.

EXEMPTIONS.

If, in the opinion of the attending veterinarian, it is inappropriate for certain dogs to exercise because of their health, condition, or well-being, the breeder, exhibitor may be exempted from meeting the requirements for those dogs.

Such exemption must be documented by the attending veterinarian and, unless the basis for exemption is a permanent condition, must be reviewed by the attending veterinarian.

FEEDING.

Dogs must be fed at least once each day, except as otherwise might be required to provide adequate veterinary care. The food must be uncontaminated, wholesome, palatable, and of sufficient quantity and nutritive value to maintain the normal condition and weight of the dog. The diet must be appropriate for the individual dog’s age and condition.

Food receptacles must be used for dogs, must be readily accessible to all sizes of dogs in the different breeds, and must be located so as to minimize contamination by excreta and pests, and be protected from rain and snow.

Feeding pans must either be made of a durable material that can be easily cleaned and sanitized or be disposable. If

the food receptacles are not disposable, they must be kept clean and must be sanitized. If the food receptacles are disposable, they must be discarded after one use. Self-feeders may be used for the feeding of dry food. If self- feeders are used, they must be kept clean and must be sanitized. Measures must be taken to ensure that there is no molding, deterioration, and caking of feed.

WATERING

If potable water is not continually available to the dogs, it must be offered as often as necessary to ensure their health and well-being, but not less than twice daily for at least 1 hour each time, unless restricted by the attending veterinarian. Water receptacles must be kept clean and sanitized, and before being used to water a different dog or social grouping of dogs.

CLEANING, SANITIZATION, HOUSEKEEPING, AND PEST CONTROL. CLEANING OF PRIMARY ENCLOSURES.

Excreta and food waste must be removed from primary enclosures daily, and from under primary enclosures as often as necessary to prevent an excessive accumulation of feces and food waste, to prevent soiling of the dogs contained in the primary enclosures, and to reduce disease hazards, insects, pests and odors. When steam or water is used to clean the primary enclosure, whether by hosing, flushing, or other methods, dogs must be removed, unless the enclosure is large enough to ensure the animals would not be harmed, wetted, or distressed in the process.

Standing water must be removed from the primary enclosure and animals in other primary enclosures must be protected from being contaminated with water and other wastes during the cleaning.

The pans under primary enclosures with grill-type floors and the ground areas under raised runs with mesh or slatted floors must be cleaned as often as necessary to prevent accumulation of feces and food waste and to reduce disease hazards pests, insects and odors.

Sanitization of primary enclosures and food and water receptacles.

  • Used primary enclosures and food and water receptacles must be cleaned and sanitized before they can be used to house, feed, or water another dog or social grouping of
  • Used primary enclosures and food and water receptacles for dogs must be sanitized at least once every week and

more often if necessary to prevent an accumulation of dirt, debris, food waste, excreta, and other disease hazards. Hard surfaces of primary enclosures and food and water receptacles must be sanitized using one of the following methods:

  • Live steam under pressure
  • Washing with hot water and soap or detergent, as with a mechanical cage washer
  • Washing all soiled surfaces with appropriate detergent solutions and disinfectants, or by using a combination detergent/disinfectant product that accomplishes the same purpose, with a thorough cleaning of the surfaces to remove organic material, so as to remove all organic material and mineral buildup, and to provide sanitization followed by a clean water
  • Pens, runs, and outdoor housing areas using material that cannot be sanitized using the methods provided, such as gravel, sand, grass, earth, or absorbent bedding, must be sanitized by removing the contaminated material as necessary to prevent odors, diseases, pests, insects, and vermin

HOUSEKEEPING FOR PREMISES.

Premises where housing facilities are located, including buildings and surrounding grounds, must be kept clean and in good repair to protect the dogs from injury, to facilitate the husbandry practices required, and to reduce or eliminate breeding and living areas for rodents and other pests and vermin. Premises must be kept free of accumulations of trash, junk, waste products, and discarded matter. Weeds, grasses, and bushes must be controlled so as to facilitate cleaning of the premises and pest control, and to protect the health and well-being of the animals.

PEST CONTROL.

An effective program for the control of insects, external parasites affecting dogs, and birds and mammals that are pests, must be established and maintained so as to promote the health and well- being of the dogs and reduce contamination by pests in animal areas.

EMPLOYEES.

Each person maintaining dogs must have enough employees to carry out the level of husbandry practices and care required. The employees who provide for husbandry and care, or handle animals, must be supervised by an individual who has the knowledge, background, and experience in proper husbandry and care of dogs to supervise others.

The employer must be certain that the supervisor and other employees can perform to these standards

Carriers and intermediate handlers must not accept any dog for transport in commerce unless their animal holding area meets the minimum temperature requirements, or unless the consignor provides them with a certificate signed by a veterinarian and dated no more than 5 days before delivery of the dog to the carrier or intermediate handler for transport in commerce, certifying that the dog is acclimated to temperatures lower than those required.

A copy of the certification must accompany the dog to its destination and must include the following information:

  • The consignor’s name and
  • The tag number, microchip or tattoo assigned to each

A statement by a veterinarian, dated no more than 5 days before delivery, that to the best of his or her knowledge, each of the dogs contained in the primary enclosure is acclimated to air lower temperatures but not lower than a minimum temperature, specified on a certificate, that the attending veterinarian has determined is based on generally accepted temperature standards for the age, condition, and breed of the dog.

AIR TRANSPORTATION.

During air transportation of dogs, it is the responsibility of the carrier to observe the dogs as frequently as circumstances allow, but not less than once every 4 hours if the dog cargo area is accessible during flight. If the animal cargo area is not accessible during flight, the carrier must observe the dogs whenever they are loaded and unloaded and whenever the animal cargo space is otherwise accessible to make sure they have sufficient air for normal breathing, that the animal cargo area meets the heating and cooling requirements.

The carrier must determine whether any of the dogs are in obvious physical distress, and arrange for any needed veterinary care as soon as possible. If a dog is obviously ill, injured, or in physical distress, it must not be transported in commerce, except to receive veterinary care for the condition.

Except during the cleaning of primary enclosures, during transportation in commerce a dog must not be removed from

its primary enclosure, unless it is placed in another primary enclosure or facility that meets the requirements.

 

DOGS HEALTH HOUSED

Dogs that are housed in the same primary enclosure must be compatible, with the following restrictions:

  • Females in heat (estrus) may not be housed in the same primary enclosure with males, except for breeding purposes
  • Any dog exhibiting a vicious or overly aggressive disposition must be housed separately
  • Puppies 3 months of age or less may not be housed in the same primary enclosure with adult dogs other than their dams or foster dams, except when permanently maintained in
  • Dogs may not be housed in the same primary enclosure with any other species of animals, unless they are
  • Dogs that have or are suspected of having a contagious disease must be isolated from healthy animals in the colony, as directed by the attending When an entire group or room of dogs is known to have or believed to be exposed to an infectious agent, the group may be kept intact during the process of diagnosis, treatment, and control.

 

Care in transit.

Surface transportation (ground and water)

Any person transporting dogs in commerce must ensure that the operator of the conveyance, or a person accompanying the operator, observes the dogs as often as circumstances allow, but not less than once every 4 hours, to make sure they have sufficient air for normal breathing, that the ambient temperature is within the limits.

The person must ensure that the operator or person accompanying the operator determines whether any of the dogs are in obvious physical distress and obtains any veterinary care needed for the dogs at the closest available veterinary facility.

Carriers and intermediate handlers must not accept a dog for transport in commerce more than 4 hours before the scheduled departure time of the primary conveyance on which the dog is to be transported. However, a carrier or intermediate handler may agree with anyone consigning a dog to extend this time by up to 2 hours.

Carriers and intermediate handlers must not accept a dog for transport in commerce unless they are provided with the name, address, and telephone number of the consignee.

Carriers and intermediate handlers must not accept a dog for transport in commerce unless the consignor certifies in writing to the carrier or intermediate handler that the dog was offered food and water during the 4 hours before delivery to the carrier or intermediate handler.

The certification must be securely attached to the outside of the primary enclosure in a manner that makes it easily noticed and read. Instructions for no food or water are not acceptable unless directed by the attending veterinarian. The certification must be securely attached to the outside of the primary enclosure in a manner that makes it easily noticed and read. Instructions for no food or water are not acceptable unless directed by the attending veterinarian. The certification must include the following information for each dog

  • The consignor’s name and address
  • The tag number, microchip or tattoo must be assigned to each dog
  • The time and date the dog was last fed and watered and the specific instructions for the next feeding(s) and watering(s) for a 24-hour period
  • The consignor’s signature and the date and time the certification was

Carriers and intermediate handlers must not accept a dog for transport in commerce in a primary enclosure unless the primary enclosure meets all the requirements.

A carrier or intermediate handler must not accept a dog for transport if the primary enclosure is obviously defective or damaged and cannot reasonably be expected to safely and comfortably contain the dog without causing suffering or injury.

 

“Buying/preparing/caring for a puppy and Responsible Pet Ownership”

Leadered by Julie Sanders & Gopi Krishnan, integrated by Axel Dubois, Wenche Skogli, Attila Marton

THE MOST IMPORTANT OBJETIVE OF THIS COMMISSION is to ensure that all

member countries world wide guarantee that all dogs live healthy and happy with responsable owners that can follow the FCI Guide Lines that guarantee the welfare health and well-being by breeding only healthy dogs using only bloodlines free of hereditary deseases in every breed , to produce only healthy puppies ,with the possibility of testing their dogs before breeding them with DNA tests to determine the predisposition for some hereditary deseas In their breeds bloodlines. Some labs has and produce , in which are at the forefront of pioneering control methods that all breeders can use only if they wish .

Purebred dogs of many breeds are prone to specific abnormalities which may be familial

or genetic. Often, these health problems are unapparent to the average breeders and can only be detected with DNA tests. That today, approximately 900 hereditary diseases and genetic predispositions are recognized in dog breeds bloodlines , respectively. Many are well characterized from clinical signs to the genes defects. Precise diagnostic tools have been developed to detect affected carriers and genetic counseling for dog breeders that can improve the health of their dogs in future generations.

“Best Practice Breeding”

Leadered by Attila Marton integrated by Gopi Krishna, Julie Sanders, Raymond, Axel Dubois

What does responsible breeding mean?

Responsible breeding is the long-term commitment of breeding pedigree dogs with the aim of preserving, promoting, and improving the breed. It involves understanding genetics, demands careful planning of selection, and always keeps the welfare of the dogs in focus to produce healthy, temperamentally sound, happy, well-adjusted, and socialised puppies.

In simpler terms: love, passion, dedication, and professionalism.

It is crucial to distinguish responsible breeding where breeders care about their animal’s welfare from breeding for profit and commerce where there may be little or no care. In simplest terms, breeding is a labour of love!

 

What is the Illegal Puppy Trade?

 The illegal puppy trade is the opposite of responsible breeding. It involves the unethical trading of puppies as commercial goods, treated, and sold as such and not as sentient beings. These puppies are mass produced with the intention of being sold commercially, born either on puppy farms or supplied through a network of unscrupulous breeders. They are bred in poor and inhumane conditions that break animal welfare laws and welfare standards. Puppies are raised with total disregard for their health or mental wellbeing to keep costs low and to maximise profits.

The puppies are usually put under a lot of physical and mental stress and anguish. They are separated too young from their mothers and then transported illegally in vans or cars, suffering cramped poor conditions without food or water, as they are transported vast distances, often crossing international borders. They are handed around until they reach their final point of sale. As a consequence of this horrific treatment, many of these puppies die during transit.

What is a Puppy Farm?

 A puppy farm is a facility where multiple popular dog breeds are kept in large numbers under shocking, inhumane living conditions and are continually bred without rest. They are almost always in poor health due to total disregard for their proper welfare or care. Puppy farms produce unhealthy and poorly socialised puppies for sale to the mass market cheaply. The breeding dogs are bred until they are no longer of use and then disposed of. The unscrupulous “breeders” do not have a love or passion for dogs but are 100% profit-driven, as this is a business venture to maximise profit and minimise expenses.

With profit being the driving factor, the dogs used for breeding are not properly fed or looked after. Bad breeding practices and the lack of professional selection results in producing sick and unhealthy puppies with several genetic and health issues. Separated very young from their mothers, the puppies are deprived of proper human and canine socialisation, which can lead to various and serious behavioural and temperament issues in the future.

As the puppies grow, these problems may easily lead to them being abandoned or relinquished to a shelter. Furthermore, many are not properly vet checked or vaccinated and may carry diseases that affect other animals and posing potential risks even to humans. For example, rabies is still present in many parts of the world, coupled with other diseases such as echinococcosis, Toxoplasma gondii

With profit being the driving factor, the dogs used for breeding are not properly fed or looked after. Bad breeding practices and the lack of professional selection results in producing sick and unhealthy puppies with several genetic and health issues.

Separated very young from their mothers, the puppies are deprived of proper human and canine socialisation, which can lead to various and serious behavioural and temperament issues in the future.

As the puppies grow, these problems may easily lead to them being abandoned or relinquished to a shelter. Furthermore, many are not properly vet checked or vaccinated and may carry diseases that affect other animals and posing potential risks even to humans. For example, rabies is still present in many parts of the world, coupled with other diseases such as echinococcosis, Toxoplasma gondii, Giardia and Leishmania. Certain forms of Leishmania are fatal to humans if untreated.

The Online Pet Trade

The increasing popularity of shopping online has led to people buying pets on the Internet, as it is quick and easy. Some sellers even offer delivery. The illegal puppy trade and puppy dealers have also switched from traditional selling to online classified ads and social media sites as an easy way to maintain anonymity and avoid responsibility to provide healthy and sound puppies.

Puppy dealers are third party intermediaries who buy and sell on puppies, often pretending to be the breeder. They provide false information and deceive new owners as to the true origin of the puppy. They resort to all sorts of deceptive tactics and use every sales gimmick to ensure a quick and easy sale before too many questions are asked, and their true intentions revealed.

A large proportion of puppies sold online are from puppy farms and the Illegal puppy trade and therefore may have health and socialisation issues. The purchase of a puppy online, without any proper research, only encourages and enables the illegal puppy trade, continuing the culture of cruelty and abuse to dogs and puppies, who are treated as commercial goods.

Puppy dealers make huge profits and know that the chances of prosecution are low. Many opportunists also use the Internet for false sales. They get potential buyers to part with deposits that never ultimately lead to the sale of a puppy, and they just disappear after the transaction. A responsible breeder may require a small deposit, but it will come with a guarantee of a full refund if the puppy is not purchased. Signed paperwork ensures the legality of a deposit.

Responsible breeders will insist on going through the regular motions of vetting potential new owners. The welfare and long- term wellbeing of the puppy is their primary goal, and they want to ensure that the puppy will be cared for properly.

With the illegal puppy trade in Europe alone worth 1.5 billion Euros per year, involving an excess of 2.4 million dogs traded in terrible conditions, some countries and governments are recognising this and putting in place legislation to help address the illegal puppy trade. Conscious and responsible dog purchasing habits play a crucial role in fighting the illegal puppy trade.

How to distinguish between a responsible breeder and an unscrupulous breeder/puppy dealer

It is essential to distinguish between two types of breeders: Responsible Breeders and Unscrupulous Breeders. Responsible Breeders are the type of breeders you should be looking for in your quest to buy a puppy. Their reason for breeding a litter of puppies is motivated by the improvement, preservation, and promotion of a breed. Unscrupulous breeders only see breeding as a source of income. Due to the pure financial motivation, they ignore the needs of dogs which leads to several welfare and behavioural issues in the future. That is not to say that Responsible Breeders do not charge for their puppies to cover the costs of raising a litter, but it is not solely for profit or to make a living.

A Responsible Breeder does not just want to sell a puppy but also wants to make sure the future welfare of dogs coming from their kennel is guaranteed. They want to make sure that they go to loving homes where the new owners are aware of and understand the unique features, temperament, and nature of that breed. Besides love, new owners should be able to provide a suitable environment for the puppies to grow up and live in. This often means Responsible Breeders will vet prospective new owners and may have a longer list of questions for them than they have for the breeder. It also usually means that the new owner may have to wait for a puppy, as a Responsible Breeder tends to breed a limited number of litters in a year. A Responsible Breeder will also have in-depth knowledge of the breed and will be happy to answer any questions and help provide the new owner with resources in their research for the breed.

Responsible Breeders will encourage the new owner to meet the puppies together with their mother and possibly with the other dogs in the household. This situation is perfect for observing the interaction of the puppies and gives an idea of what a full-grown adult dog looks like, behaves like and the care that will be required for a decade or more. The new owner will also have an idea of the environment in which the puppy was brought up in and the health status of the mother dog.

Responsible Breeders will provide new owners with information about the characteristics and the unique needs of the breed. They will also give advice about how to take care of the puppy, providing information on nutrition, a vaccination card, microchip details, health test results (where relevant), a pedigree certificate (where relevant) and will be open to give the new owner further support if it is needed for the lifetime of the puppy. A Responsible Breeder will NEVER sell a dog online without having met the new owner in person to ensure they will provide a suitable home for the puppy.

Responsible Breeders will also have contracts of sale. They will clearly instruct and insist that if the new owner is unable to take care of the puppy anymore for whatever reason, the breeder will take the puppy back, either to keep the puppy or to rehome the puppy.

Furthermore, Responsible Breeders will conduct available genetic or other health tests and regular veterinarian checks on the parents of the puppies to ensure that any potential genetic diseases or conditions will not be passed on. In the case of Kennel Club Breeders, such health tests and screenings are a regulated requirement by the breed club or the kennel club. They will be able to provide certain health guarantees depending on the nature of the potential illness or disease. They will also want to be informed if the puppy ever suffers from any illness or unwanted health condition. It is vital to understand that dog health is a complex topic and having health screenings done is just one part of the story. Besides the steps taken by a Responsible Breeder, the new owner will also need to ensure the correct care of the puppy to keep them healthy.

Kennel Club Breeders only sell puppies with certified pedigrees. A certified pedigree is the dog’s birth certificate. Dogs with a certified pedigree are identifiable as they are either microchipped or tattooed. Besides the information it gives on the dog, it also shows the ancestries. Most importantly, it certifies the dog is purebred. A certified pedigree is proof of the generations of work that responsible breeders put into preserving the breed. Based on its nature, any health or genetic test they have carried out will also be listed on the certified pedigree of the puppies. The pedigree may also help to prove the ownership of a dog depending on a country’s national legislation and could be used to track a dog or provide proof of ownership in a legal case.

Below is a checklist to help new owners differentiate between responsible and unscrupulous breeders/puppy dealers.

Responsible Breeders Unscrupulous Breeders/Puppy Dealers
They are usually dedicated to one or a very limited number of breeds only. They usually offer several breeds available for purchase.
They are driven by passion and love for their breed. They are driven by profit as they make their living by selling puppies.
They have been involved in their breed for a long time and can give you detailed information about the breed. They will only give very general information and are only interested in closing the sale.
Responsible breeders will carefully select and screen their dogs for breeding. They will carry out appropriate health and genetic testing of their dogs for breeding and will show you proof of such tests. Their dogs have never been assessed by anyone as suitable for breeding and they have no real concept or selection criteria when planning mating.
They will ask questions to make sure you are a suitable owner for one of their puppies, asking several questions to ensure you understand the breed and the responsibilities involved. They will not ask you any questions regarding your suitability but be keen to close the sale.
They will usually have a waiting list for their puppies, and they are able to direct you to another breeder if they think the wait may be too long. They will have a plentiful supply of puppies for sale, and if they don’t have your required breed, they may try to convince you to purchase another breed that they have ready for sale.
They will insist that the puppy is collected from their home where the new owner can meet the puppy’s mother and all the puppies from the litter. They will rarely ever show you the parents of the puppy or the environment the puppies were brought up in and may offer to deliver the puppy or meet you somewhere for handover.
They will never part with a puppy until they are at least 8 weeks old, microchipped (or identified otherwise) and had their first vaccination. They may be selling puppies at a very young age who are not vaccinated or microchipped. Vaccination and microchipping means decreased profits.
They will insist on a Puppy Contract to ensure the welfare of the puppy. They will not provide a contract of sale and may not even be happy to provide you with a receipt because it provides proof that they have sold you the puppy
They will always take back the puppy and insist that the puppy is returned to them if anything does not work out. They are not interested in taking the puppy back but will blame you for things not working out.
They will provide a Breed Info sheet, nutrition information, vaccination card, microchip details, pedigree certificate (if relevant) and will always be there to answer any queries about the puppy. They may not provide you with any information or they may tell you to Google feeding information and advice. If they provide you with a pet passport then ensure to check all the details as it may indicate that the puppy has been imported.

 

What to consider before buying a puppy. Are you suited to owning a dog?

 Before even doing any research into getting a puppy, the first and most important part is to ensure that you are suited and ready to own a dog!

To help with this, below are things you need to consider if you are thinking about having a puppy:

  • Does your lifestyle and work schedule allow you to care for a dog truly?

Owning a dog means you now have a living creature reliant on you to care for it, at least for the next 10 to 15 years! If you have a busy lifestyle, be prepared to make some serious time adjustments to ensure your dog is cared for properly. For example, you need to spend time daily taking your dog for a walk, feeding, grooming/brushing, and most importantly, playing and spending quality time with your dog. Feeding and regularly letting your dog out into the garden is not only all that is required. That’s the bare minimum. So, if you cannot give them the time, love, and affection they deserve, please do not get a dog!

  • How much time can you dedicate to train your puppy when you get it?

The correct answer to the question above is – AS LONG AS IT TAKES! Puppies need to be trained and socialised by you. They do not come pre-trained! This becomes more of a challenge if you are also a novice pet owner! Puppies are living beings, so they are curious, easily bored, vocal, and sometimes stubborn. They are often confused in a new environment, not to mention homesick and missing their mother and littermates. Training a puppy takes lots of patience, more patience, a little more patience, persistence, endurance, and a whole lot of love. Negative or aggressive training methods NEVER work. Kind reward-based training and being persistent, and never giving up is the key! Do you have what it takes?

  • Is your entire household agreeable to this new family member?

A howling puppy in the middle of the night for the first week. Chewing of your shoes and dog hair on the furniture. A puppy peeing in the house until toilet trained. If you live with a family, it would be a wise decision to ensure that everyone is agreeable with the idea of a puppy joining your family. There is nothing worse than a hostile family member who doesn’t want a puppy. The stress caused will not be worth it. The introduction of a new puppy needs everyone’s agreement.

Most importantly, please don’t get a puppy to teach your children responsibility. If that is your motivation, be sure it seldom works out, and you will become the primary carer of the puppy even if this was not the intention.

Do you know the local authority/town council rules about dog ownership? Can you meet the requirements? Check the rules of your local authority/town council about dog ownership to see if you can meet them. Some even have breed-specific legislation that bans the ownership of certain breeds, or they have in place rules which means that dogs are not allowed to go off leash or they must have a head collar or a muzzle when out in public.

  • If you live in an apartment, does the management allow dogs?

If you live in a flat/apartment, be aware that some buildings/landlords do not allow pets, so it is worth checking with your management the rules about dog ownership. Unfortunately, many people get a puppy before they have checked this and then go through the heartbreak of returning the puppy. This is not fair on both you and the puppy.

  • Can you really afford a dog?

Having a puppy costs not just the price of the purchase but much more. Maintaining the health and welfare of a puppy as it grows and for its entire life is a factor few people consider. In the case of a dog, it may mean 10-15 years. During this time, you will need to provide good quality dog food, vet visits, vaccinations, visits to a groomer, treats, toys and supplements, as well as pay out for a dog sitter or boarding kennels when you go on holiday.

These are just the basics that already amounts to a considerable sum over the lifetime of your dog. What if your dog falls ill or suffers an accident? Veterinary treatment or surgery costs can cost more than your own medical bills. Better to be prepared for a worst-case scenario than not be able to provide the best care for your dog in an emergency. And all this does not take into account damage caused to your personal things by a bored puppy!

  • Have you done your research on what breed of dog suits your family’s lifestyle and living space?

Statistics indicate that 92% of dogs that need to be rehomed are due to breed incompatibility or suitability. Rescue centres and shelters are full of dogs that people bought on impulse and did not do enough research, if any research. Dogs come in all shapes and sizes and with different breed characteristics. The FCI recognises over 350 dog breeds.

The most important thing when choosing a dog is to look sensibly at your lifestyle and decide which breed fits best. People

never consider what the traits and characteristics of the breed are before buying. For example, it is not wise to buy a husky puppy if you live in a flat and have an inactive lifestyle. This is a dog that needs lots of space and exercise. Impulse buying and lack of proper research into the breed is always the issue. PLEASE research the breed to find out if it suits your lifestyle and living space before being caught up by the latest fashion trend or cuteness factor. Start your research with the problems of the breed, as this will immediately give you an indication if you can cope or not.

  • Having decided on your breed, have you found a responsible local breeder?

If you are new to a breed, the best guidance you can get is from someone already owning this breed. The Internet is a great resource, but experience is more important. Buying your puppy from a reputable breeder who has dedicated their love and affection to a breed is the best start you can get. Not only do you have someone to turn to for advice, but you will be able to see the breeder’s dogs and what an adult dog of your chosen breed looks and acts like. A responsible breeder will also be dedicated and committed to breeding healthy and sound puppies, as their motives are not for profit but for the love of that breed. Finding a responsible breeder makes all the difference between a great start and a stressful one!

  • Questions to ask a breeder

One of the critical factors in getting a puppy is the source. Where a puppy comes from determines welfare and health in a complex way.

You do not want to buy from a puppy dealer who is part of the illegal dog trade or get a puppy from a puppy farm where cruel

methods are employed to produce puppies. Both these sources cut corners to minimise costs and maximise profits which may lead to the puppies having health and behavioural issues. Never buy from an intermediary and be very cautious if you search for a puppy online. Always make sure you buy direct from the breeder but remember that there are responsible breeders, and there are unscrupulous breeders.

The importance of finding a responsible breeder is key in acquiring a healthy, well-adjusted puppy who has been given the best start in life and has been bred for all the right reasons, which are not about profit. But how do you find a responsible breeder?

It is a good starting point to contact the local kennel club or national breed club in your country. This will help ensure that the breeders you will talk to have a genuine passion for their breed and are not commercial breeders. Go to a dog show or dog training class to meet breeders. Get as much information as you can to answer all your queries. Do not be afraid to speak to several breeders. Be wary of anyone who tries to push a sale immediately or requires a deposit before having more in-depth conversations with you. Warning signals should go off at this stage.

Here are some questions that you can ask a breeder to ensure that they are a responsible breeder.

 

  • How long have they been working with this breed? What got them involved in the breed?
  • Why this breed of dog? What makes it unique? What is the breed’s good and bad points?
  • Do they have an information sheet on the breed, or what books or trustworthy websites could they recommend to find out more about the breed? What about a puppy care sheet or information?
  • Are they able to provide references about themselves as a breeder or their dogs?
  • If relevant to the breed, what health or genetic tests have the parents undergone? Will they be able to show you the certificates? What health guarantees can they provide for the puppy? What is the return policy should something go wrong?
  • When can you visit their home to see the parents and the puppies together?
  • How many puppies were there in the litter? Will you be able to see all the puppies?
  • At what age can they pick the puppy up (this should not be before 8 weeks old)? How many vaccinations will the puppy have at the time of collection, and what about deworming? Will the puppy be microchipped (this is now a legal requirement in many countries)?
  • Is there a contract of sale? Are there any requirements mentioned that you need to know about, g., will the pup be required to be neutered and will they take the puppy back if the new owner is unable to care for them?
  • What sort of socialisation regime has the breeder done? How should you maintain the socialisation process if you get the puppy? When and what type of basic training classes do they recommend you attend with your puppy?

Does the puppy come with a certified pedigree from an FCI recognised National Kennel Club? It is highly recommended that you buy a puppy with a Pedigree Certificate, as you then have proof of the puppy’s origins.

  • Some breeders will tell you and even show you that the parents are registered, but they do not plan to register the puppies. Responsible breeders will register all their puppies to ensure that the lineage remains accountable. The pedigree certificate is the proof of authenticity of the generations the breeders proudly stand Find out if there are any requirements or restrictions placed on the Pedigree Certificate of the puppy.

 

And most importantly……Did they ask you a lot of questions too? Perhaps even more than you asked them? That shows that they care what happens to the puppy they bred!

Every time you visit breeders, please respect their privacy and home. Always keep in mind that they let you into their homes, so behave accordingly.

What to Look for when visiting a breeder to see a puppy The premises where the pups live

  • Go to visit the pups at the breeder’s home, to see them in their home Does the premises look respectable and clean? Ask if this is the location where the puppies were born.
  • Where are the puppies kept, outdoors or in the house? It does not mean that puppies kept in kennels will have issues, but if they are kept outdoors, are the

kennels appropriate and clean? Do the puppies appear to be well socialised?

  • Ask where the puppy usually sleeps – in a crate, in a dog bed and the type of bedding

The mother and father

  • Is the mother there with the whole litter? Always insist on seeing the puppies with their mother. A mum should be there interacting with her puppies, so be aware of any stories about the mum being at the vet’s, on a walk or at a friend’s house, as it could indicate that the puppies have been bred on a puppy farm and the seller is a puppy dealer.
  • If possible, ask to see the father of the puppies If not there, ask to see a photo of the father, as well as details of this dog. If the father is not present, that is normal and general. Breeders often choose another dog from another kennel for mating for various professional reasons.
  • If the breeders have informed you that the parents of the puppies were health tested (in the case of breeds that have specific health tests), ask for copies of the results if such information is not already included in the certified pedigree. The breeder will be able to explain the various abbreviations and annotations to explain the various health tests undertaken if applicable

The breeder

  • Do you notice several other litters of puppies of the same or different breeds around? This again is another indication of possible puppy farming/dealing.
  • Does the breeder appear genuinely concerned about the puppies and can they tell you each puppy’s individual characteristics and name?
  • Do you feel that you are being pushed into making a quick decision?

The puppies

  • Do the puppies look clean, healthy, and bright? Do they behave balanced and lively? Are they showing that natural puppy curiosity? Be cautious of symptoms like runny eyes or noses, dull, matted, or patchy coats or even signs of diarrhoea, weakness or wobbliness or a puppy that sits in the corner looking
  • How are the puppies interacting with each other? What about with their mum?
  • Have the puppies got plenty of toys and things to play with?
  • Are the puppies nervous or scared when you carefully approach them? Does it appear there are people around to regularly interact with the puppies?
  • Ensure that the puppy—depending on its age—has at least had its first vaccination and deworming Ask to see the vaccination card to check that the details and dates are correct, including details of the vet who has vaccinated the puppy. If the puppy is microchipped, then ensure the microchip number on the vaccination card matches the microchip implanted inside the puppy.
  • Ensure to ask for a care guide (preferably in advance) to know how to care for your puppy, such as the type of food the puppy needs and how regularly the puppy needs.
  • If the breeder provides you with a pet passport it may indicate that your puppy has been Carefully check all the details such as the origin and ownership details of the puppy, the vaccination and vet details and ensure the microchip details match. If you believe the puppy to be illegally imported (puppies can only be imported at 16 weeks of age within the EU with the correct vaccinations and documentation – refer to your government website for more details) then report it to the relevant authorities.
  • If you have agreed to buy an imported puppy, ensure that the puppy has been legally imported (and not bred on a puppy farm) and that all the correct paperwork is in place (refer to your Government website for information regarding live animal import rules). If your puppy is found to be illegally imported, it may be removed by the authorities and either put in quarantine at your cost or

General Information

  • It is highly recommended that you buy a puppy with a certified pedigree. You then have proof of the puppy’s origins and assurance that the puppy has been bred according to guidelines set out by the National Kennel Club or Breed Club. Find out if you will get the certified pedigree when picking up the puppy or if this will come later. If you get it at the time of purchase, ensure the transfer of ownership form is signed and given to In some countries, there is a processing time in registration.
  • If you plan to show or breed the puppy, it is essential to know if the puppy is registered by an FCI recognised National Kenne Look for the FCI logo on the Pedigree Certificate.
  • If you are in doubt about anything you are told, feel free to get clarification from the local FCI affiliated National Kennel

If anything, does not feel right or if you suspect you have just met a puppy farmer or puppy dealer, do not agree to purchase the puppy even if you feel sorry for it – this just fuels the illegal puppy trade and promotes puppy farms, causing even more puppies and breeding dogs to suffer. Instead, report your concerns to the appropriate authority.

What is a Certified Pedigree?

A Certified Pedigree is your dog’s birth certificate containing the family tree showing the dogs ancestors. Most importantly, it certifies your dog is purebred.

It contains the following information

  1. Official name of your dog
  2. Breed
  • Colour
  1. Registration number
  2. Date of birth
  3. Sex
  • Microchip number (or another unique identification number) viii)Breeder name
  1. ix) Lastly, it contains the lineage information for 3, 4 or 5 generations of ancestors with their names, colours, registration

All pedigree certificates have the official stamp of the issuing National Kennel Club. If it is a member or a contract partner of the FCI, the pedigree also contains the FCI logo. The FCI has only one recognised Pedigree dog registry (officially named studbook) per country.

The pedigree certificate may also show further information, such as health test or DNA test results, results of trials, dog show titles. It depends on the administrative regulations of the National Kennel Club or the breed club as to the detail shown on the certificate. All the titles and awards a dog earns at recognised events also becomes part of its pedigree certificate for example when a dog wins a championship title, it will have it permanently noted in its pedigree. Any buyer of an offspring of a champion dog will know it by looking at the pedigree. A close look at the ancestor’s names on the pedigree for the abbreviation “CH” indicates how many champions have made up the genetics of this dog. With dog breeding, it can also give some assurance that the future offspring of the dog, if mated well, will carry on those desirable traits. Other championships related to dog sports and trials like Field and Obedience also have their abbreviation and are noted on the pedigree.

The pedigree certificate is not a health certificate! It is a record and proof of lineage and the dog’s identity, not a record of health. A vaccination certificate is the official proof of your dog’s vaccinations. A pedigree certificate on its own is also not a guarantee of quality. The simple rule of thumb is that all exceptional dogs are registered, but not all registered dogs are exceptional. “Quality” is subjective and dependent on so many factors. That’s why it’s important to buy from a responsible kennel club registered breeder.

But a word of caution – some puppy farmers also register their puppies for pedigree certificates. Please do your own evaluation, based on the tips given here to help you identify a Responsible Breeder.

When buying a purebred puppy, never pay extra for a Pedigree Certificate. Registered pedigree puppies always must come with the Pedigree Certificate as proof of being purebred. Asking extra money if you want a pedigree is a trick of unethical puppy dealers.

Breeding of dogs

Breeding of dogs is the purposeful bringing together of a male and female dog, with the intention to have puppies preserving the breed. The breeding of dogs has inherited a negative reputation in recent years due to irresponsible breeders, puppy farms and the illegal puppy trade. However, responsible dog breeders care passionately and professionally for their breed and the puppies they have bred, and they are happy to give all the time, money and care that is required to breed dogs responsibly for a happy and healthy life.

Professional, responsible breeding demands complex knowledge. Breeders should understand the biology and reproduction of dogs and the breed(s) they keep. They need to know how to keep, breed, and raise dogs to guarantee their health and welfare. Nutrition, biological and behavioural development, and regular health checks play a vital role in this.

Breeding is not just giving birth to a litter of puppies it also means carefully selecting the two dogs for mating. And to make such a responsible decision also takes expertise.

What is a Kennel Club?

A Kennel Club is a dedicated organisation that covers all activities related to registered breeding in a country. A Kennel Club regulates breeding requirements, runs the studbook, and issues Pedigrees. They advocate and educate about the professional breeding of purebred dogs. They also organise other dog-related activities, such as dog shows, dog sport events, trails, and so on. Furthermore, they strive to promote and raise awareness of responsible dog ownership, care, and welfare, aspiring to be the most effective advocates for purebred dogs in their countries whilst safeguarding the pureness of the purebred genetic pool.

Many national kennel clubs are members of the FCI (Federation Cynologique Internationale), which is the largest, leading international organisation, for all things related to Pedigree dogs. With the range of activities catering to all interests, Kennel Clubs are the dog club for all dog lovers.

History of breeding of dogs

The FCI recognises over 350 breeds of dogs globally. Many of them have historical origins dating back hundreds and thousands of years. Dogs have been alongside humans performing various tasks for thousands of years, which is one of the reasons they have been such a successful and respected species. Humans have selectively bred dogs throughout the history of domestication to produce dogs with specific characteristics, for example, to assist with hunting, herding, and guarding. Humans worked out that if dogs could be bred for specific traits, their offspring would also have these traits, which would further aid the survival of humans.

Selective breeding is the procedure of breeding purposefully selected dogs, with the idea to produce and preserve certain physical and behavioural characteristics, health conditions, skills, and aptitudes to be able to perform unique tasks. This breeding of dogs to enforce a skill unique to that breed has been used for centuries to help society, such as police dogs, rescue dogs, sniffer dogs, dogs for the disabled, guide dogs for the blind, etc. Breeding and forming dog breeds was not a random act but a well-planned and thought-out activity.

Fast forward hundreds of years, and the wonderful dog breeds we see at dog shows or dog events today, have not happened by accident. Each breed has taken years of planning and loving work of dedicated breeders that has continued through the ages. Due to the technical development and change of lifestyle, some of the functions of dogs have been replaced with technology, which is why many breeds face extinction, with some having ceased to exist. Breeders who breed to preserve dog breeds are usually hobbyists with a thorough knowledge of breeding.

What is breeding dogs actually about?

Dog breeding to responsible breeders is about passion, expertise, and commitment. The core of the activity is to preserve and maintain the breed for further generations via selection. It is not something taken lightly or done on a whim but is a labour of love for their chosen breed. It requires solemn commitment and responsibility because it involves bringing living beings into this world, who will go on to have an impact on the lives of the families they go to become part of. Part art and part science. It can be very time consuming, expensive, and in some instances, heart-breaking and should never be viewed as a source of income. Responsible Breeders will invest their time to ensure that they produce healthy and sound puppies through the correct matching of parent dogs, carrying out genetic tests where relevant, and providing the right environment for the puppies so that they are properly cared for and socialised.

Why & who should breed?

The purpose of a responsible breeder must be the preservation and improvement of the breed with safeguarding dog health and welfare, which demands knowledge.

Knowing the FCI breed standard (blueprint) of their chosen breed, understanding how to identify and address genetically inherited disorders and health issues, spending time and gaining experience via observation are all vital. Without in-depth study, years of experience in their chosen breed, or without the close guidance of a mentor, it is impossible to know or envision the end goal when it comes to breeding. Which is why it should be very carefully considered and thought out beforehand.

Why choose a Kennel Club registered breeder?

It is essential to distinguish between two types of breeders: Responsible Breeders and Unscrupulous Breeders. Responsible Breeders are the type of breeders you should be looking for in your quest to buy a puppy. Their reason for breeding a litter of puppies is motivated by the improvement, preservation, and promotion of a breed. Unscrupulous breeders only see breeding as a source of income. Due to the pure financial motivation, they ignore the needs of dogs which leads to numerous welfare and behavioural issues in the future. That is not to say that Responsible Breeders do not charge for their puppies to cover the costs of raising a litter, but it is not solely for profit or to make a living.

A Responsible Breeder does not just want to sell a puppy but also wants to make sure the future welfare of dogs coming from their kennel is guaranteed. They want to make sure that they go to loving homes where the new owners are aware of and understand the unique features, temperament, and nature of that breed. Besides love, new owners should be able to provide a suitable environment for the puppies to grow up and live in. This often means Responsible Breeders will vet prospective new owners and may have a longer list of questions for them than they have for the breeder. It also usually means that the new owner may have to wait for a puppy, as a Responsible Breeder tends to breed a limited number of litters in a year. A Responsible Breeder will also have in-depth knowledge of the breed and will be happy to answer any questions and help provide the new owner with resources in their research for the breed.

Responsible Breeders will encourage the new owner to meet the puppies together with their mother and possibly with the other dogs in the household. This situation is perfect for observing the interaction of the puppies and gives an idea of what a full-grown adult dog looks like, behaves like and the care that will be required for a decade or more. The new owner will also have an idea of the environment in which the puppy was brought up in and the health status of the mother dog.

Responsible Breeders will provide new owners with information about the characteristics and the unique needs of the breed. They will also give advice about how to take care of the puppy, providing information on nutrition, a vaccination card, microchip details, health test results (where relevant), a pedigree certificate (where relevant) and will be open to give the new owner further support if it is needed for the lifetime of the puppy. A Responsible Breeder will NEVER sell a dog online without having met the new owner in person to ensure they will provide a suitable home for the puppy.

Responsible Breeders will also have contracts of sale. They will clearly instruct and insist that if the new owner is unable to take care of the puppy anymore for whatever reason, the breeder will take the puppy back, either to keep the puppy or to rehome the puppy.

Furthermore, Responsible Breeders will conduct available genetic or other health tests and regular veterinarian checks on the parents of the puppies to ensure that any potential genetic diseases or conditions will not be passed on. In the case of Kennel Club Breeders, such health tests and screenings are a regulated requirement by the breed club or the kennel club. They will be able to provide certain health guarantees depending on the nature of the potential illness or disease. They will also want to be informed if the puppy ever suffers from any illness or unwanted health condition. It is vital to know that dog health is a complex topic and having health screenings done is just one part of the story. Besides the steps taken by a Responsible Breeder, the new owner will also need to ensure the correct care of the puppy.

Kennel Club Breeders only sell puppies with certified pedigrees. A certified pedigree is the dog’s birth certificate. Dogs with a certified pedigree are identifiable as they are either microchipped or tattooed. Besides the information it gives on your dog, it also shows the ancestries. Most importantly, it certifies your dog is purebred. A certified pedigree is proof of the generations of work that responsible breeders put into preserving the breed. Based on its nature, any health or genetic test they have carried out will also be listed on the certified pedigree of the puppies. The pedigree may also help to prove the ownership of a dog depending on a country’s national legislation and could be used to track a dog or provide proof of ownership in a legal case.

In summary, these are some reasons why you should choose a Kennel Club breeder:

  • They have a genuine interest in and dedication to the breed, including health, welfare, and preservation of the breed for future
  • They have the knowledge and breed expertise, having been involved in the breed for a reasonable length of time and have proven their commitment.
  • They have studied the Breed Standards and breed strictly according to them to preserve and improve the breed, so they plan every litter carefully and have a good reason for each
  • They will ensure the welfare of the dogs that are bred These dogs may be their family pets as well.
  • They are not profit driven and do not take short cuts or compromise on providing the best care for the pups they This cover proper nutrition, socialising, regular vet checks, vaccinations, and deworming.
  • They take great care in raising the litter of puppies to be healthy, mentally sound, and well socialised examples of the
  • They will vet new owners to ensure they are well suited and the best fit for a puppy and the The future welfare of the puppy is their utmost concern.
  • They advise you whether the breed fits into your lifestyle, what special knowledge or care will be necessary to raise and keep your dog.
  • They will keep in touch with you and assist you when necessary after your new dog arrives in its new

Registering of puppies & Certified Pedigrees

 

All Kennel Club Breeders will register their puppies with their National Kennel Clubs. If the National Kennel Club is affiliated with the FCI, then the pedigree is accepted by all other National Kennel Clubs, which are members or contract partners of the FCI.

What is a Certified Pedigree?

A Certified Pedigree is your dog’s birth certificate containing the family tree showing the dogs ancestors. Most importantly, it certifies your dog is purebred.

  • It contains the following information
    1. Official name of your dog
    2. Breed
  • Colour
    1. Registration number
    2. Date of birth
    3. Sex
    4. Microchip number (or another unique identification number)
    5. Breeder name
    6. Lastly, it contains the lineage information for 3, 4 or 5 generations of ancestors with their names, colours, registration information.

All pedigree certificates have the official stamp of the issuing National Kennel Club. If it is a member or a contract partner of the FCI, the pedigree also contains the FCI logo. The FCI has only one recognised Pedigree dog registry (officially named studbook) per country.

The pedigree certificate may also show further information, such as health test or DNA test results, results of trials, dog show titles. It depends on the administrative regulations of the National Kennel Club or the breed club as to the detail shown on the certificate. All the titles and awards a dog earns at recognised events also becomes part of its pedigree certificate for example when a dog wins a championship title, it will have it permanently noted in its pedigree. Any buyer of an offspring of a champion dog will know it by looking at the pedigree. A close look at the ancestor’s names on the pedigree for the abbreviation “CH” indicates how many champions have made up the genetics of this dog. With dog breeding, it can also give some assurance that the future offspring of the dog, if mated well, will carry on those desirable traits. Other championships related to dog sports and trials like Field and Obedience also have their abbreviation and are noted on the pedigree.

The pedigree certificate is not a health certificate! It is a record and proof of lineage and the dog’s identity, not a record of health. A vaccination certificate is the official proof of your dog’s vaccinations. A pedigree certificate on its own is also not a guarantee of quality. The simple rule of thumb is that all exceptional dogs are registered, but not all registered dogs are exceptional. “Quality” is subjective and dependent on so many factors. That’s why it’s important to buy from a responsible kennel club registered breeder.

But a word of caution – some puppy farmers also register their puppies for pedigree certificates. Please do your own evaluation, based on the tips given here to help you identify a Responsible Breeder.

When buying a purebred puppy, never pay extra for a Pedigree Certificate. Registered pedigree puppies always must come with the Pedigree Certificate as proof of being purebred. Asking extra money if you want a pedigree is a trick of unethical puppy dealers.

How to find a Kennel Club breeder

Many National Kennel Clubs also have Breed Clubs with their specific functions and activities, dedicated and specialised for a particular breed or a group of breeds.

Both these organisations are great sources of help and information in your quest to find out more about your chosen breed and

where to find a Responsible Breeder. Breed Clubs also run events you can attend to learn more about the breed. It is also an opportunity to meet other owners and breeders and acquire more knowledge from a variety of people.

Ask for a list of breeders from either of these organisations, which should be the first step in finding a Responsible Breeder. You still can do your own research to find the right breeder to buy your puppy from, based on the advice given above.

 

FCI Committee for Canine Welfare and Health Responsible dog breeding guidelines

Review & feedback Comments in general: ATTILA MARTON

  • We revised the guidelines based on the characteristics of the FCI, considering the current procedure and requirements in dog breeding and keeping in mind that the activity of the FCI-related breeders is non-commercial breeding.
  • It is essential to mention that the guideline does not differentiate between FCI-registered breeding, breeding facilities with mass production, and backyard (home breeding by households) The guideline covers any activity leading to the reproduction of dogs.
  • At specific topics, the concept is vague, offering a one-size-fits-all solution—avoiding a breed-specific approach—while simplifying complex
  • It is essential to note that in the case of scientific references, the used available literature is not complete nor completely accurate; thus, it may shade procedures, requirements, or expectations. Additionally, scientific evidence (based on examining a specific population) cannot be handled as hard evidence in all cases. Therefore, exceptions should also be considered.

Recommendations:

  •  The document covers many important aspects of dog breeding with valuable knowledge for the sake of dog The Committee does not fully agree with all points. The guideline is an independent non-FCI-related document that can be effectively used as reference material, a guideline for many kennel clubs for implementation, and a good starting point to clarify and discuss topics of debate.
  •  The document is a thorough material related to dog welfare matters, and we recommend its implementation with the following comments:
  • Selection of parents
    • General consideration (page 8)
  • “Breeders are required to know the specific welfare risks of extreme conformations and inherited disease related to breed or individual (Gough et al 2018). They should avoid breeding dogs for extremes of physical type and minimise the extent of inbreeding (breeding from closely related individuals) which has the potential to be detrimental to the dog’s quality of life.” Extreme conformation is an undefined term.

    It is not specified what we consider an extreme conformation from the aspect of the whole body or specific body parts, taking breed-specific traits into consideration.

    It is also undefined which conformation anomalies and to what extent are linked to the health problems of a dog.

    As the document covers everyone related to breeding—not just FCI-registered kennels—it is vital to see that dogs that are not associated with registered breeding, a breed standard as a reference point is not applicable. In the case of these dogs, setting up criteria and deciding whether the dog meets conformation requirements is impossible.

    Furthermore, there is a vast market demand for dogs with rare coat colour or unique outlook (as the blue French bulldog, fluffy French bulldog), various designer breeds, teacup dogs. These variations do not have a professional breed standard. Without the standard as a reference point, it is impossible to define conformation extremities.

    The FCI Scientific Commission has already published its official report on the Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome. Further documents related to exaggerated conformation and hyper type are under development by the FCI Committee for Canine Welfare and Health.

 

Leadered by Niksa Lemo integrated by Claudio Rossi, Julie Sanders, Wenche Skogli, Gopi Krishnan

Review & feedback Comments in general: ATTILA MARTON

FCI certification scheme

THIS WORK WILL NEED THE APPROVAL OF THE FCI BOARD

Group 3

Niksa Lemo, Claudio N. Rossi, Julie Sanders, Wenche Skogli, Gopi Krishnan, Attila Marton

What is the goal of our group:

  • Observe the certification scheme for pure breed dogs in FCI countries (NO national organisation)
    • Quality assurance in relation National kennel club and breeders
    • Veterinary involvement in breeding process and final certification
    • Legislation by the country (Government/Ministry) and its implication to certification of all FCI recognised breeds
  • Observe the relation of National Kennel club to certification of own native breeds and recognise FCI countries who support the native breeds as national heritage or different privilege status
  • To produce FCI certification scheme

What we can do now:

  • We need to collect all information from FCI national kennel clubs through the questionary and set the table/document
  • Questionary must be disuses in detailed in this group and must involve all data necessary to certification of pure breed dogs and pedigree issue
  • Questionary must be in form that we can easily analyse results and publish same ones in our FCI page

What we will get from our work

  • Clear picture of FCI certification of pure breeds dog and enormous work of different subjects in that process
  • Share experience between FCI countries and make a stronger bond in certification between different FCI countries
  • Prevent potential deviation in involvement of non-registered FCI breeding stock
  • Data of certification will be easily visible for the veterinary organisations and media